Helen OakesHolidays are a great past-time with kiwis. We were born to travel and especially when we are so far away from the rest of the world. Kiwis love to pack up the car, get on the road and get away from it all. As a nation of explorers, when we do to travel, we often stay in holiday homes, baches and cribs.

The term Crib is generally used in the South Island and moreso Southland. When I moved to the South Island I hadn’t actually heard of the term crib and got initiated by a southern friend. As a North Islander I referred to a holiday home as a bach but if you are from Invercargill and Dunedin it is a crib.

Years ago cribs started as very small dwellings that were built out of cheap or recycled material that was either old timber, fibrolite or corrugated iron. Farmers and early settlers lived in cabins and sheds and this influence came through in cribs. Some cribs had caravans as the main structure and then they were built onto to make them larger.

Cribs also brought about the middle class beach holiday lifestyle. Traveling around the country was easier with the uptake in cars and better roading. Quite often cribs stay in the family and are passed down the generations. The real iconic cribs still look like an original dwelling with old or second-hand furnishings in keeping with the history of these homes.

The word crib is also used around the world but means different things, like a babies bed. Crib is also popular slang in the United States for a house or any kind of dwelling that is attributed to rappers and hip-hop culture.

As a photographer I’ve always had a passion for creative art and recently I have started to feature some Kiwiana Digital Prints with sayings, words, phrases and colloquialisms in my Etsy store.

If you’re a home sick Kiwi living abroad, my artwork may just be an ideal solution for a dose of New Zealand artwork to decorate your home or office.

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